Here’s how bots work on Facebook Messenger

Following the F8 conference, Facebook has released the use of bots within Facebook Messenger.  With an initial 33 companies included, these bots can potentially provide a wide scope of use and function.

You can order food or check the weather outside, with some interesting personal touches.  Despite this however, their actual function is somewhat limited in the present as their function blur into more generalized suggestions.  For example, CNN’s bot frequently only offered top headlines and was unable to provide more personalized recommendations.

It is almost a given that these bots will improve over time, but how so has still yet to be seen.  Will they take advantage of individual profiles when addressing a query or sending a message or will they adapt to user specific messages more frequently?  I feel like this may effect their evolution over time, but this is remained to be seen.

http://mashable.com/2016/04/12/how-to-use-facebook-messenger-bots/#asgk19QsAsqm

Questions:

  1. Do you see this becoming popular, with Facebook users regularly interacting with company bots to receive personalized information?
  2. Do you think Facebook will allow bots to take advantage of profile information to provide a more personalized experience?
  3. Will other forms of social media follow with the use of bots?
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4 thoughts on “Here’s how bots work on Facebook Messenger

  1. I think that for those who use Messenger a lot, this could be a valuable platform for companies. I personally don’t ever use Facebook messenger, I find it irritating to have to go into another app. Also, if you don’t have my phone number in order to text me, you only can message me on Facebook, ten to one I don’t want to hear from you. I feel the same about these bots. I have most of these companies apps and thats enough contact from them for me.

    I also don’t know how people would feel about bots utilizing their personal information to give a more tailored experience. It kind of feels like an invasion of privacy that I don’t think people will be that excited about.

  2. I agree with Kendall, though I do utilize FB messenger for group chats. More recently, however, I have started to use group me.

    If someone doesn’t have my number, they’ll initially reach out through FB for it, or asked me about it in person. Once that introduction has been made, I will text the person.

    On the other hand however, this may be helpful for user that are always running out of storage on their iPhone, like myself, and constantly has to delete apps or pictures. Instead of downloading multiple apps for different platforms/services, they can use this new tool instead.

  3. I agree with Kendall, though I do utilize FB messenger for group chats. More recently, however, I have started to use group me. Typically, If someone doesn’t have my number, they’ll initially reach out through FB for it, or ask me about it in person. Once that introduction has been made, I will text the person.

    On the other hand, however, this may be helpful for users that are always running out of storage on their iPhone, like myself, and constantly have to delete apps or pictures. Instead of downloading multiple apps for different platforms/services, they can use this new tool instead.

  4. While reading this article a couple things jumped out at me. The first item was the continued attempts to create artificial intelligence. When I hear “bots,” I initially want to compare them to iPhone’s “Siri” or the Amazon Echo’s “Alexa.” To be honest, I do not know anyone who uses Siri. If people do not use Siri, why would people use other “bots” of forms of AI. Having said that, I think bots do have a place in the future. We have not reached the point of acceptance, yet I do think we are getting closer. Once we do reach the point of acceptance, the future of AI could be impressive.

    Secondly, I instantly compared the idea of “bots” to the Chinese messaging platform “WeChat.” While I am not a user of WeChat, it does appear to be very interactive across many businesses. From my understanding, WeChat does not use bots, but it is does use a messaging platform to integrate services. The idea of “bots” and increased services thru the messaging platform should stunt the download many apps (now that everything will be located in one central platform). I am curious how businesses / app developers will adapt.

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