L.A. Clipper’s Matt Barnes gets Emotional on Twitter

http://www.nydailynews.com/sports/basketball/barnes-ejected-rips-clippers-teammates-twitter-article-1.1516660

So I was watching the Oklahoma City Thunder / L.A. Clippers game last night and the game it was pretty good. There was great shooting and high flying dunks as expected of both teams. In the second quarter though, two opposing forwards Serge Ibaka and Blake Griffin got tangled up and the Clippers’ Matt Barnes shoved Ibaka hard on the chest to protect his teammate. Both Barnes and Ibaka got ejected from the game.

A few minutes after, the NBA commentators revealed the following tweet from Matt Barnes: “I love my teammates like family, but I’m DONE standing up for these n—–! All this s— does is cost me money.”

The post has now been deleted and Barnes has tweeted apologies to his team, the NBA and the Clipper fans.

Looking at this situation, it was clearly a case of a very emotional player venting out his anger over social media. Still, the NBA commentators quickly used it as a talk point in the 2nd quarter, and continued on during the halftime and post game shows. It might have been a juicy topic to talk about so they kept on it. I don’t really want to judge and say how this should have been handled but I’m sure this reflected badly on the player, the team and the organization.

Many companies have public figures who own Twitter accounts be it celebrity endorsers or even popular personalities in employment. How does one even begin to manage what these people say online? What they say will clearly reflect their organization and connections and it feels like some sort of monitoring or regulation should happen.

  • Was there a better way for the NBA to handle this tweet situation?
  • How do we make sure that tweets from public figures don’t get out of hand?
  • Can/should we even try to regulate them?
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2 thoughts on “L.A. Clipper’s Matt Barnes gets Emotional on Twitter

  1. Was there a better way for the NBA to handle this tweet situation?
    He should have either not tweeted when he was feeling upset or he should have kept his tweet positive. A better tweet would have been “My team is family. We protect each other. We sacrifice for each other.”

    How do we make sure that tweets from public figures don’t get out of hand?
    I don’t think we can regulate anyone’s tweets. Freedom of speech says it’s lawful. However, it is in the best interest of the public figure to monitor their tweets, as it could reflect negatively on them.

    Can/should we even try to regulate them?
    I think that is an agreement between the brand/personal manager and the public figure.

  2. Agree with rira3. He should not have tweeted. However, we all say things we wish we could take back, but in the digital space there are different rules: no take backs and a much larger audience/impact.

    I don’t think there is much that can be done to regulate. People need to act responsibly and deal with the consequences of their actions. Can’t prevent people from acting irrational not matter what controls are put in place. If both parties agree to the limitations than its within their rights to forgo a right.

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