Do you need a vacation from Social Media?

Without a doubt we now live much more of our lives online and through social media. In this article on Mashable, the trend of social media vacations is discussed. A “vacation” from social media is temporarily deactivating your account or taking a hiatus for a while. 

Personally, I have seen an increasing number of friends temporally deactivate their accounts for an escape. Sometimes it is to avoid someone or because they are going through a sensitive time. The article states that the most common reason cited for a social media vacation was irrelevant updates and a lack of time. 

The article reports some interesting statistics about our social media use.

– 40% of adults have more than one social networking profile

– The average adult manages 3.1 email addresses (up from 2.6 a year ago)

– 35% of those surveyed spend more than 31 minutes a day on social media. 

– 60% of users experience anxiety on social media

 

Questions to discuss:

1) Have you taken, or considered taking a break from social media?

2) What does this trend say about our behavior/habits with social media? 

 

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3 thoughts on “Do you need a vacation from Social Media?

  1. I personally have not taken a break from social media, but that might be simply because I do not consider myself to be a heavy user. I could see myself physically needing to take break if I were a heavy user with thousands of friends requiring constant updates about my status. I imagine that keeping up with that many followers would almost be like a second job for some. This trend, to me, shows that some people are becoming too attached to their social networks with 60% of them experiencing anxiety from it. How much stress do they get from their real jobs?

  2. In general, I try to limit my social media usage – so similar to the post above I don’t find myself needing a “vacation.” However, I am not surprised by some of the statistics posted above. There’s no question that more and more people are trending online for information/data, but there should be a balance. This goes back to the content debate. If there’s valuable and important data online (regardless of the social media platform), I doubt we’ll see sustained “vacations” from anyone.

  3. After a bad breakup, I deactivated my FB profile for 2 months and really enjoyed it and the mini “vacation” it allowed me to take. I have seen some younger coworkers show anxiety about their social media accounts and “who did what to whom” type conversations. I think overall, that the availability of social media has already become fully ingrained into our daily lives. If you look at people the next time you are on a subway, plane or in an elevator, the use of small talk is almost non-existent and people actually interacting with each other has dramatically decreased. There is no longer a balance if you don’t want there to be a balance. Especially with my 2 year old nephew, it is amazing to watch how comfortable kids are with technology in general, but that brings a negative as kids no longer play outside or use their imagination and create forts, build elaborate role playing with their friends outside, and instead they use their iPads or play video games.

    It is telling that more than 90% of people bring their phone with them when they go to the bathroom. Unfortunately for society, it has become a crutch. I have seen it in my own behavior as I check my email, FB, and Twitter in bed before I get in the shower in the morning. I think that is a big negative in and of itself as it effects sleep patterns and creates anxiety for me before the “work day” actually starts. Cutting the Social Media cord is something I plan on doing in the 2nd half of 2013.

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